AAC Resources for the Classroom

AAC in the Classroom

I’ve learned a lot about AAC technologies over the last 15 years.  I often say that I don’t know everything, but I can probably tell you how and where to learn more.  Because I provide direct technology support and training to educational teams for many students with impaired language and communication skills, I have gathered a wealth of forms, tip sheets, tutorial resources, assessment materials, etc. for use in the school setting.  I share these with teachers and treating speech therapy clinicians across my service area, as well as anybody looking to learn more.  I hope these resources are helpful to those working (or planning to work) in the school setting with children who need or use AAC supports.  There are SO many more than these, but this is where I’d like to start.

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AAC in the Classroom for Young Children (part I)

It’s always exciting to see kids with limited speech and language abilities respond to the use of visually supported communication tools and strategies. Images are easy to recognize and recall, making the transference of information universal…no matter what the ‘language’ might be!  It’s easy to understand something visual, even if we can’t read the script or verbalize its name or meaning.

STOP in french

McDonalds in Arabic
You might not know the language, but you know what these sign mean!

I routinely help teachers and speech therapy staff create adaptive communication supports and modify classrooms to create a language immersion environment for young learners. Unfortunately, just talking about augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can scare the life from those unfamiliar with the process!  While the terminology may sound intimidating, it really isn’t that complex for this particular group.  In the next few posts, I’d like to offer some information, ideas, and resources to help those in the school setting alleviate their fears and elevate their enthusiasm for using AAC in the classroom with young students!

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Free Resources for AT, AAC, Modifying the Curriculum

I love great resources and I really love them when they’re FREE! If you’ve never visited the Special Education Needs (SEN) Teacher website, you need to do it now.

SEN Teacher offers a wealth of FREE printables, a page full of links to specialized support sites, as well as free software downloads for addressing the academic, sensory, communication, and assistive technology needs of children with special needs.

Most printable resources can be adapted to suit a variety of individual needs. All SEN Teacher resources are free to use at school and in the home.

Here are a few examples …

 

Quick AAC Photo Cards ⋆SEN Teacher image
Visual Aids Printables: Quick AAC Photo Cards

 

Printables ⋆SEN Teacher image
SEN Teacher Printables
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Resources for Families of Children with Autism

Autism logo

I am an ATP working in the special education setting, but I’ve also been an OT for almost 30 years. Since the goal of OT is to improve functional independence and the goal of AT use is to provide tools that help accommodate for disability, the two are a perfect match.  Although my role is to foster academic engagement and success in the classroom, we all recognize the importance of the child’s family as members of the education team.  Carryover in the home is a key piece to supporting that success!

In this post, I’d like to share some of the resources that I routinely offer to parents to introduce them to the use of visual supports, AAC  tools and strategies, and sensory strategies commonly used within the classroom.

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Preparing the Significantly Challenged Child for Eye Gaze

Wow!  A great crowd here so late in the day for our session on eye gaze control at the ATIA 2016 Conference.  The sun did come out in Orlando after all, yet the room was filled with superachievers who wanted to know how to help their kids with significant needs.  Unfortunately, the handout link provided by the organizers was incorrect, so I am posting the resources here for those looking for them. Thanks to all who attended and please contact me with any questions you may have! Although my session Powerpoint titled “Preparing the Significantly Challenged Students for Eye Gaze” is posted here, it does not contain all of the video material shown at the conference (per parental request).  Also posted here is my Considerations Checklist for Eye Gaze Participation.  This form will provide guidance and help gather details and data on student preferences, responses, and needs when introducing or using eye gaze activities.

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Autism Resources

Geneva Centre for Autism logo

 

 

 

We had a great time last week with Ms. Mo Buti, learning more about how to best serve the needs of our students with Autism. She shared some great resources that I plan to pass along to all of you here over the course of the next week..

If you’re looking for awesome professional development opportunities online, this is a great place to start!  The Geneva Centre for Autism (located in Ontario) provides free printable visual supports and downloadable resources, as well as online PD options.  Although created for use by Canadian teachers, the site is open for public access by creating a (free) account. Free courses related to the education and treatment of students with Autism include: 

 

Characteristics of Autism

What is Applied Behavior Analysis?

Using Reinforcement

Functions of Behavior

Communication Strengths and Challenges

Understanding Sensory Needs

Understanding Social Challenges in Children and Adolescents

Learning Styles

Using Visual Supports

Understanding Stress and ASD

Paying Attention to Transitions and Transition Planning

Promoting Independence for Community Inclusion

Certificate: Introduction to Autism: Free Online Series for Educators

 

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Teaching ‘Visually Supported’ Communication to Visually Impaired Students

Mo Buti and our session attendees have been sharing some amazing suggestions for teaching communication skills to non-verbal students who also have visual impairments. Here are a few of those ideas and resources!

Tactile Connections Kit

TACTILE CONNECTIONS KIT: SYMBOLS FOR COMMUNICATION   This kit helps teachers create a tactile card system that is individualized for visually impaired and blind learners who have additional disabilities and/or lack a formal means of communication or literacy. The tactile symbols are created when part of an object is mounted on a hand-sized card representing core vocabulary categories (e.g. people, places, actions, objects, etc.). This kit provides some of the essential components that assist in a system’s construction and application.

The PERKINS site offers some great resources for teaching communication to visually impaired students.

Tactile books are used to teach literacy, so why not pair them with separate cards containing the same key words, characters, etc. found in the books to reinforce language learning? Pinterest (everybody’s favorite collecting site) offers a wealth of ideas for CREATING TACTILE BOOKS that can be paired with tactile communication supports. Here is another link to MORE TACTILE BOOKS FOR LANGUAGE AND LITERACY.

 

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LessonPix: An Online Program for Creating With Visual Supports

 

LessonPix  logo

A speech therapist friend recently introduced me to this amazing new resource and I have been smitten! I love my traditional picture-library programs as much as the next therapist, but it is frustrating when I can’t create needed supports because the software CDs are back in the office. This site eliminates the need to carry software and install on multiple systems and makes it easy to create instantly from any location!  This is especially helpful when I visit a classroom and want to provide ideas and examples of curriculum or communication supports for specific activities right then!

LessonPix is an easy-to-use online resource that allows users to create customized learning materials using a database of more than 25,000 visual symbols on their site.  They provide access anytime, anywhere and offer outstanding articles with ideas for integrating visual supports.  Creations are stored online in your account for future use and a Sharing Center allows users to share their creations or find new inspiration from materials made by others, arranged by topic and subject!  The site requires a subscription of $36/year and is worth every penny!

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Curriculum Supports for Students with Autism

Most teachers and clinicians will tell you that, while they understand the ‘what and why’ for teaching students with Autism, they have very little time (if any!) and are often at a loss for the ‘how’ ideas.  Let me introduce you to an amazing resource … The Autism Helper!

This site is operated by Sasha Halligan, a dynamic, skilled teacher with extensive experience in curriculum modification for students on the Autism Spectrum.  She routinely offers freebie materials  and Sasha’s TeachersPayTeachers site is full of other resources on myriad topics, all aligned to core standards.  Just reading her daily posts and seeing her creative ideas for teaching and supporting picture-based communication is fun.  I love TAH and so will you!

TAHelper logo

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Boardmaker Tutorials and Guides

Snowman Activity Book
Snowman Activity Book

snowmageddon 2015

 

Wow!  We’ve been out of school here in east Tennessee for 2 full weeks due to “snowmageddon 2015”. I missed seeing my students while trapped at home under ice and snow, but it gave me a lot of time to create new curriculum materials using visual supports. Take a look at our ready-to-print thematic project titled “Let’s Build a Snowman’ in case you need something to tie in with our recent weather events.  Of course, now I am working on projects for Easter and spring in hopes that we can wish the cold weather away!

While working on my projects, I realized that I’d never shared the Boardmaker Help & Training Center site created by Mayer-Johnson/Dynavox.  An excellent resource, it contains tips, guides, and short video tutorials to help when learning to create with Boardmaker products.  It’s easy to navigate and offers a host of supports.  Check it out today! 

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